Pastor’s Message

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Welcome to our Second Sunday of Easter and Divine Mercy Sunday. I have to say I am not very knowledgeable on the Divine Mercy Chaplet, but I know many are and so are many in our parish. In my Universalis app it gives a reflection on Divine Mercy Sunday, the following is taken from the reflection:

Since 2000, the second Sunday of Easter has also been known as Divine Mercy Sunday. Pope John Paul II said on the occasion of the canonization of Sister Faustina Kowalska on April 30, 2000:

Today my joy is truly great in presenting the life and witness of Sr. Faustina Kowalska to the whole Church as a gift of God for our time. By divine Providence, the life of this humble daughter of Poland was           completely linked with the history of the 20th century, the century we have just left behind. In fact, it was between the First and Second World Wars that Christ entrusted his message of mercy to her. Those who    remember, who were witnesses and participants in the events of those years and the horrible sufferings they caused for millions of people, know well how necessary was the message of mercy.

Jesus told Sr. Faustina: “Humanity will not find peace until it turns trustfully to divine mercy.” Through the work of the Polish religious, this message has become linked forever to the 20th century, the last of the      second millennium and the bridge to the third. It is not a new message but can be considered a gift of       special enlightenment that helps us to relive the Gospel of Easter more intensely, to offer it as a ray of light to the men and women of our time.

What will the years ahead bring us? What will people’s future on earth be like? We are not given to know. However, it is certain that in addition to new progress there will unfortunately be no lack of painful          experience. But the light of divine mercy, which the Lord in a way wished to return to the world through Sr. Faustina’s charism, will illumine the way for the men and women of the third millennium.

It is important then that we accept the whole message that comes to us from the word of God on this Second Sunday of Easter, which from now on throughout the Church will be called “Divine Mercy Sunday.” In the various readings, the liturgy seems to indicate the path of mercy which, while re-establishing the relationship of each person with God, also creates new relations of fraternal solidarity among human beings. Christ has taught us that humanity not only receives and experiences the mercy of God but is also called to practise mercy towards others: “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy.” He also showed us the many paths of mercy, which not only forgives sins but reaches out to all human needs. Jesus bent over every kind of human poverty, material and spiritual.

It is not easy to love with a deep love, which lies in the authentic gift of self. This love can only be learned by penetrating the mystery of God’s love. Looking at God, being one with God’s fatherly heart, we are able to look with new eyes at our brothers and sisters, with an attitude of unselfishness and solidarity, of generosity and forgiveness. All this is mercy!